13 spooky sites so that they do not let tourists

Edition Reаder”s Digest compiled a list of the 13 worst places across the country. They are so terrible that they don’t allow tourists. But don’t worry — it’s not like you would want to get to these places.

13 настолько жутких достопримечательностей, что в них не пускают туристов

Photo: Depositphotos

Shopping center Randall Park

When, in 1976, the Mall opened Randall Park, it was the largest shopping center in the United States. Located near Cleveland, its retail space was occupied almost 2.2 million square feet (61 ha). But when it comes to malls, bigger they are, the harder they fall and this one is no exception. It ceased operations as a shopping center in 2009, and demolition began in 2014, although still preserved parts of the former shopping center.

Jazzland theme Park Six Flags in New Orleans

From Jazzland theme Park Six Flags in New Orleans was short life. It opened in 2000 to permanently closed after hurricane Katrina in 2005. Since it was empty, and the once-thrilling rides remained motionless and lifeless. Jazzland is not a “Ghost” in the traditional sense of the word, but is a very visible reminder of the devastation a hurricane and all the lives that were then lost. For this reason the mayor wants to tear it down.

Women’s prison Rentz

The former women’s prison Rentz, located near the town of Jefferson (Missouri) big enough. When it opened in 1926, it was a prison farm for men. When did the “Great flood of 1993” in Rence lived only women. The prisoners were evacuated and the building was left derelict ever since, as devastating flood waters reached 38,6 ft. Since then nature took over the building, but some people reported that it is not quite empty. Since then, the Rentz was named “the most haunted place in Jefferson city the” Society of paranormal research and investigations of Missouri.

Gilman, Colorado

The former mining town of Gilman (Colorado), located on a 600-foot cliff above the Eagle river. Gilman was a fairly successful mine, founded in 1886, mining was carried out until 1984. At the time it was closed due to toxins, now he is empty since then. It is forbidden to visit, in addition, local authorities plan to get rid of this town, so while we have the chance to go and see at least from afar.

Large hall, Detroit

This magnificent building in the art Deco style when I saw some of the largest halls. In addition, there were pharmacies, shops and more. Since 1972, the hall was empty nobody wants, like other parts of an abandoned neighborhood.

Mental institution, Rockland

What’s even scarier than an abandoned psychiatric hospital? How about one that is partially abandoned and partially still functioning as a hospital? This is the case when the past meets the present is very creepy. A popular place for paranormal investigators. The most terrible part is the former children’s wing, where the wall still has toys, desks and figures. Although some hospitals still open, abandoned offices are closed to the public.

Lighthouse Tillamook Rock

Lighthouse the Tillamook Rock is about a mile (1.6 km) from the North coast of Oregon and has long been closed to the public. Nicknamed nicknamed “Terrible Tilly,” the lighthouse, seem to have been cursed since then, as in 1880, and its construction began, starting with the moment when Mason jumped into the sea and were never seen. In 1881, shortly before the opening of the lighthouse: a ship Lopate crashed in dense fog, killing all 16 crew members.

Nose Brother Island

It is hard to imagine a part of new York city that is completely abandoned and closed to visitors, but so is the case with North Brother island, just off the coast of the Bronx. He’s definitely seen its share of tragedy with countless people dead on a small plot of land. Here not only were people with infectious diseases, including typhoid fever, but about 1000 people who took after in 1904, the boat caught fire at sea.

Drawbridge CA

This former railway depot in the Bay of San Francisco is not only a Ghost town, but sinks in water. Its isolated location made it an ideal place for bootleggers during Prohibition and host a number of brothels. He also served as a resting place for a weekend in the city, especially for families with children. The city’s population peaked in 1928, then the town had 90 houses. How interesting it may sound, all that is left is in private ownership, so it is illegal to investigate.

Centralia, PA

Centralia, Pennsylvania is not only a Ghost town, but burning since 1962. Despite the fact that the official cause of the fire is not clear, previously it started at the garbage dump over an open coal seam. In the end, the fire drove the people from this former mining town. If that’s not enough not to go there, the city has a disproportionate number of cemeteries.

Of Johnsonville, Connecticut

In the 1960-ies of the rich industrialist recreated Victorian village of Johnsonville, Connecticut, the result of which was constructed suitable for period buildings from the New England area. It is hoped that this will become a tourist attraction, but that didn’t happen, and eventually it became a Ghost town. For some time he remained inactive before a Church group bought it in 2017. Today he is still in critical condition, and is a private property, so as tempting as it was not the study of this artificially dilapidated-Victorian village, it’s illegal.

Prattville-Cotton-Gin-Mill

One time, Prattville, Alabama, was a bustling mill town. Now the once mighty factory cotton gin abandoned and destroyed. Although this cave, the empty factory is scary enough, mill is also accompanied by a Ghost story: rumor has it that its haunted by a Lady in black — mother, who, according to legend, threw herself from the city dam after her young son died in an accident in the workplace.

The Pines

Many of the former Borscht Belt resorts, The Pines is one of the few that was not destroyed. It has the same terrible traits, as in other abandoned hotels: shredded room, empty pool and even a skating rink. Strange to think about all the people who were vacationing there in the past — when something is like a dream resort, turned into a post-apocalyptic wasteland. But this does not mean that it is open to the public.