Scientists have recorded one of the most powerful explosions in the Universe since the Big Bang

Astronomers recorded the most powerful explosion of energy in the Universe since the Big Bang. Some experts compare the opening in significance with the discovery of the first dinosaur bones. This writes Lenta.Ru.

Ученые зафиксировали мощнейшую вспышку во Вселенной со времен Большого взрыва

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The explosion occurred near the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy, remote from Earth 390 million light years and is located in the Ophiuchus cluster. The release of energy was so strong that it punched a giant hole in the plasma surrounding the cluster. In this cavity could fit 15 galaxies of the milky Way.

Scientists had previously observed a gap through the x-ray telescopes, however, they rejected the idea that the phenomenon is explosive in nature. This hypothesis was confirmed during observations, using telescopes and other instruments, sensitive to different wavelengths: x-ray Chandra, XMM-Newton, ESA, antenna Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) in Western Australia and the radio telescope Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in India.

“Before, we saw the flash in the centers of galaxies, but it is really massive. And we don’t know why it’s so big,” said Professor Melanie Johnston-Hollit, writes Hromadske.

She said that the explosion occurred very slowly, “like an explosion in slow motion, which lasted for hundreds of millions of years”.

According to her, the explosion occurred, the release of energy, which is five times the previous record.

The first hint of this giant explosion actually came in 2016. Then, astronomers saw a strange curved edge in Ophiuchus. However, scientists did not anticipate the eruption, given the amount of energy needed, writes UNIAN.

Researchers are still unknown the reason of such a strong explosion. In the future will be conducted a more thorough observations using 4096 instead of 2048 of the MWA antennas.

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