What's going through Kyrie Irving's head?

What's going through Kyrie Irving's head?

UPDATE DAY

Considered as a role model for many young basketball players in the making, NBA star Kyrie Irving goes on conspiratorial slippages and shares content conveying hate speech on his social networks.< /p>

Irving did it again last weekend by posting a film on Twitter promoting hateful and anti-Semitic theories. Now deleted, this publication continues to make people talk.

The anti-Semitic and controversial publication by Kyrie Irving.

This event only accentuated the concerns that some observers have about the impact that the words of the American star can have, concerns that Kyrie Irving dismissed in a press conference as dehumanizing.

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If the gaming community struggled to comment on the news all weekend, and if the Silver Tour offices denounced the hate speech, without however naming Irving, he nevertheless received strong support, that of Kanye West.

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Slippage on social networks and chaotic defense at a press conference

What is this new controversy from the basketball star? It concerns the sharing on Twitter of a promotional video for the film Des Hébreux aux Nègres

Directed in 2018 by Ronald Dalton Jr. – and as Rolling Stone magazine reminds us -, the film aims to reveal the “true nature of the sons of Israel”, explaining that this “nature” and that of the blacks merge, and that whites like Arabs, by controlling the black population of Africa during the slave trade, hid this nature.

In fact, according to many scholars, this conspiracy theory follows the same lines as those promoted by some members of the Black Hebrew Israelite movement, discussed in a previous article. 

As a reminder, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center or the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), the assertions made by the most extreme fringes of this sect are, for the vast majority, hateful and anti-Semitic.

Au- Beyond the elements advanced above – and as also explained by the Rolling Stone -,Dalton's documentary argues that the mass media helps Satan dominate the world, that white Jews control all facets of society, and that white Jews also helped dispossess black people of their Jewish nature by aiding Arab slave traders and Europeans in their trafficking to maintain full control over society.

While journalists presented him with this detail of the comments conveyed by this film, Kyrie Irving reacted by saying that he does not consider its publication as hateful, “because the documentary is available on Amazon”.

He added that because this content is not hateful to him, it does not question his role in the community.

Athlete little stranger to controversial remarks

This controversy is not not the first for the athlete.

The basketball star, linked to the anti-vaccine fringe of American society, argued that mandatory vaccination was the greatest disenfranchisement in human history.

His opposition to the compulsory vaccination against COVID-19 led him to experience seasons where he was not seen in action often, namely in 2020-2021 and 2021-2022.

In 2017, Kyrie Irving also explained that he didn't know if the Earth was round or flat, saying that there was no real image of the Earth taken from space. He thus argued that we would be lied to by telling us that the Earth is round.

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He is also a fervent admirer of the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, who was sentenced to pay more than $1 billion in damages for spreading the lie that the Sandy Hook shootings were a hoax.

“Story” Instagram of Kyrie Irving supporting Alex Jones.

Presenting as a free thinker, Kyrie Irving tried to defend himself in a tense exchange with a reporter regarding the American conspiracy theorist's remarks, with which he would agree. The athlete had been able to cheer them on, as seen above in a video of Jones “warning” us about the “new world order” that would rule our lives.

Worrying positions

All of this was denounced by legends sports like Kareem Abdul Jabbar, who called on Irving's backers to drop him. 

This also worries many associations fighting against hate speech and the impact it can have on our young people when it is conveyed by stars.

For the Quebec vice-president of the Consultative Center for Jewish-Israeli Relations, Eta Yudin, the accumulation of history like this at the moment is “disturbing”.

“When you have people like that who are positions of influences and who have fun promoting these kinds of theories, it's worrying,” she explains.

She adds that “nevertheless, what is reassuring is to see that the repobration by a huge majority of the population as well as by all the partners of these people is immediate. People are reactive in refusing to see such hatred conveyed. Ms. Yutin refers here to the abandonment of Kanye West by almost all of his partners, and to the immediate disapproval of Kyrie Irving's posts by the owner of his team Joe Tsai.

Ms. Yutin concludes by explaining that this type of case must make people understand “the importance of fighting against online hatred, whether through action with governments, or whether through constant vigilance on the part of citizens to so that this kind of speech does not become democratized.”

The open support for these theories and these hateful remarks comes at a time when the thought of the black Hebrew Israelites and that of Theory Elders of Zion protocol are experiencing a new surge of interest thanks to Kanye West.